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Ramsey Hachem, MD

Tracey C. Marshall – Dr. Elbert P. Trulock Distinguished

Phone314-454-8766

Emailrhachem@wustl.edu

Additional Titles

  • Professor of Medicine
  • Associate Professor of Medicine

Related Links

Education

  • MD: UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (1997)
  • Residency, Internal Medicine: University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas, TX (2000)
  • Fellowship, Pulmonary and Critical Care Division: Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (2003)
  • Assistant Professor of Medicine: Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (2009)
  • Associate Professor of Medicine: Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (Present)

Recognition

  • Phi Beta Kappa; Southern Methodist University, 1992.
  • Magna Cum Laude, Southern Methodist University, 1992.
  • The John Miller Award, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, 2000.
  • The Robert M. Senior Award, Washington University School of Medicine, 2008.
  • The Robert M. Senior Award, Washington University School of Medicine, 2011.

Research Interests

The focus of my clinical research is lung transplantation. I am specifically interested in the development, prevention, and management of chronic allograft dysfunction, or bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome, after lung transplantation. Our group has identified both allo-immune factors such as minimal acute rejection and the de novo development of anti-HLA antibodies, and non-immune variables such as primary graft dysfunction and viral respiratory tract infections as key risk factors for the development of chronic allograft dysfunction. These highlight the complex interactions between the recipient, the allograft, and the environment that result in allograft injury and remodeling leading to physiologic dysfunction. We are currently investigating therapeutic interventions that might uncouple the relationship between these clinical events and chronic allograft dysfunction, including novel immunosuppressive approaches and anti-inflammatory agents.
In addition, we are evaluating the impact of the new lung organ allocation system on the underlying diagnoses coming to transplantation, mortality on the waiting list, and outcomes after transplantation.