See all

Jennifer Alexander-Brett, MD, PhD

Assistant Professor of Medicine

Phone314-362-9047

Emailjalexand@wustl.edu

Related Links

Education

  • B.S., Chemistry & Biochemistry (High Distinction): University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE (1999)
  • MD, PhD. Molecular Biophysics: Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (2007)
  • Residency, Internal Medicine, ABIM Research Track: Washington University School of Medicine/Barnes Jewish Hospital, St. Louis MO (2009)
  • Fellowship, Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, ABIM Research Track: Washington University School of Medicine/Barnes-Jewish Hospital, St. Louis MO (2011)
  • Physician-Scientist Training Program: Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (2013)
  • Postdoctoral Research Fellowship: Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (2013)
  • Instructor in Medicine: Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (2016)
  • Assistant Professor of Medicine: Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (Present)

Recognition

  • 1999 Phi Beta Kappa National Honor Society
  • 1999 University of Nebraska-Lincoln Chancellor’s Scholar Award
  • 2007 Spencer T. and Ann W. Olin Medical Scientist Fellow Award
  • 2008 Gregory J Gurnter, MD Internal Medicine Resident Research Award
  • 2011 Barnes Jewish Hospital Knowlton Award for Clinical Excellence 2013 American Thoracic Society Early Career Investigator Award
  • 2015 Burroughs Wellcome Career Award for Medical Scientists

Research Interests

My research interests include the role of epithelial cytokine networks and lung stem cells in development of chronic airway diseases. I employ a variety of techniques including mouse models, analysis of human samples, stem cell biology and biochemical methods. My recent work under the mentorship of Dr. Michael Holtzman has involved the phenotypic and functional characterization of disease-associated IL-33-expressing lung stem cells and their pathogenic role in driving chronic airway disease. As I transition to independence, my research on this cytokine system will focus on the pathway of cellular IL-33 activation, including biochemical and structural definition of nuclear, transcriptional regulatory and extracellular signaling forms of this cytokine. These translational studies will guide efforts toward development of IL-33 antagonists as therapeutics for chronic airway diseases including asthma and COPD.